Nuestros Espónsors

Imantación en relojes automáticos

Tema en 'Relojes racing' comenzado por Vollblut, 26/11/19.

  1. Guancho

    Guancho Soloporschista veterano

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.152
    Me gusta recibidos:
    548
    Localización:
    Michigan
    Tampoco sé exactamente si esa es la anomalía que afecta al tuyo, ojo, te estoy dando apuntes de temas generales que afectaban a esos relojes y que recuerdo de aquellos años.
     
  2. Vollblut

    Vollblut Gran Experto Porschista

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.579
    Me gusta recibidos:
    512
    Localización:
    Barcelona
    P-Cars:
    944 S2 Cabriolet 1990, 944 Turbo Cabriolet 1991
    Bueno, desde la última vez que lo llevé a revisar de nuevo no ha vuelto a fallar. Algo le habrán hecho esta vez que hasta ahora habían dejado. Gracias por los consejos.
     
  3. mazuecos

    mazuecos Nuevo Usuario

    Se incorporó:
    10/10/20
    Mensajes:
    21
    Me gusta recibidos:
    0
    P-Cars:
    987 Cayman S
    996 Carrera 4
    Interesantes reflexiones...


    Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk
     
  4. keny3

    keny3 Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    13/9/06
    Mensajes:
    1.049
    Me gusta recibidos:
    9
    Interesante, disculpar pero no me ha quedado claro que es mejor hacer en los aeropuertos, meterlo en la maleta de mano y que pase por el escáner o dejarlo en la muñeca y que pase el arco? gracias
     
  5. Andrescuin

    Andrescuin Senior +

    Se incorporó:
    5/2/13
    Mensajes:
    764
    Me gusta recibidos:
    196
    Yo siempre en la muñeca porque no hace sonar el arco, eso sí, siempre tapándolo con la manga porque alguna vez que me lo han visto antes de pasar me lo han hecho quitar.
     
  6. Vollblut

    Vollblut Gran Experto Porschista

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.579
    Me gusta recibidos:
    512
    Localización:
    Barcelona
    P-Cars:
    944 S2 Cabriolet 1990, 944 Turbo Cabriolet 1991
    Parece ser que la imantación es un problema mayor de lo que imaginaba.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/01/style/watches-magnetization.amp.html

    What to Do if Your Watch Is Magnetized
    Unfortunately, even just proximity to your phone might be enough to do it. And then?

    By Rachel Felder

    • May 1, 2020
    Suddenly your wristwatch is running 10 minutes fast. Or 10 minutes slow. Or, inexplicably, it stops entirely.

    What happened? It could be your smartphone’s fault.

    At the risk of pitting your personal gadgets against one another, in a kind of crazy electronic “Toy Story” scenario, the high tech tools we have come to rely on aren’t entirely compatible with traditional timepieces. In close contact, their internal magnets can dramatically affect a watch’s accuracy.

    And while magnetization isn’t a new problem for watches, the things that can cause it are proliferating.

    “Today we have the highest level of magnetic fields around us,” said Stefan Ihnen, associate director of technics, research and development at IWC Schaffhausen. His list of culprits includes not only smartphones and tablets, but also handbags, which frequently have magnets in their clasps.

    And there are other everyday offenders, including hair dryers, the closures on some necklaces and bracelets and that magnet of a plastic basket of oranges from the family’s last trip to Florida that’s now on the refrigerator door.

    Even more intense is the magnetic field around machines like medical MRIs and airport security scanners. “Everything’s got a strong magnet these days, even things like home audio, hi-fis, the loudspeakers on your computer,” said Justin Koullapis, a co-owner of Watch Club, a boutique in London’s Mayfair neighborhood, and the technical editor of The Horological Journal, the British Horological Institute’s monthly publication.

    Magnetization is a particular problem for mechanical watches, as it can cause some of the essential running parts, like the balance wheel and hairspring, to stick together and influence timekeeping accuracy. But quartz watches can be affected, too, as they often have steel hands that are sensitive to magnets.

    Inadvertently magnetizing your watch is easy: Placing it on top of your phone on a nightstand can do it, or simply having your wrist too close to someone whose purse has a particularly strong magnet clasp.

    Proximity increases the possibility of magnetization. “It would have to be really close,” Mr. Koullapis said. “The farther you move away from a magnetic source, the effect drops away very rapidly.” So going through airport security may not affect your watch, for example, but having a hand-held screener waved over it could produce different results.

    Many wearers initially don’t understand what has happened to their timepieces. “They don’t typically know that it’s magnetized unless it’s happened to them before,” said Ruediger Albers, president of American operations for Wempe, the watch and jewelry retailer headquartered in Hamburg, Germany. “They just report the same symptoms: that the watch, all of a sudden out of nowhere, without being dropped or impacted, either gains time, runs slow or stops. All three are possible.”

    Watch magnetization is easy to diagnose at home: Place your watch near a compass. If the compass needle moves, your watch has been magnetized.

    But don’t worry too much. The condition isn’t permanent and it’s simple to remedy with the right equipment.

    Most watch repair facilities have a demagnetizing machine, which takes just a few minutes to remove the watch’s magnetic field by quickly alternating its electrical current. Mr. Albers said his staff solves the problem with a three-step process that includes, at the end, checking the timepiece with what he called a “watch EKG” to ensure it has returned to proper operation. The service, he said, is offered free at Wempe’s Manhattan boutique, although the store is temporarily closed because of the pandemic lockdown.

    Demagnetizing machines for home use are readily available online and, with many options priced at less than $20, comparatively inexpensive.

    Decades ago, watch brands, aware of the recurrent problem, began to offer timepieces designed to resist magnetic fields.

    One of the best known is Rolex’s Oyster Perpetual Milgauss, introduced in 1956; an updated version is offered by the company. The watch is said to resist as much as 1,000 gauss of magnetism (the name combines a variation of mille, the French word for thousand, and gauss, a magnetization measurement). That’s ample protection from everyday items like a typical hair dryer, but a fraction of the protection needed against a modern MRI machine, which can emit a magnetic field of 30,000 gauss.

    The Swiss brand Alpina has introduced several antimagnetic watches since the 1930s. Its most recent option, the Alpiner 4, appeared in 2016. It promises to resist exposure to slightly more than 60 gauss of magnetism, the magnetic field that would be produced by about 40 stereo speakers booming in proximity. (The brand actually calculates magnetic strength with an alternate unit of measurement, called amperes per meter. The choice of which system to use is, according to Mr. Koullapis, simply “a question of style.”)

    IWC and Jaeger-LeCoultre have offered antimagnetic watches since the World War II era, marketed mostly at pilots; Omega introduced the Railmaster, designed to withstand 1,000 gauss of magnetism, in 1957.

    IWC’s latest series of Top Gun pilot watches, introduced last year, is resistant to more than 50,000 amperes per meter, Mr. Ihnen said. That’s far more than 600 gauss. He added that the brand is planning over the next few years to introduce more watches with that very high level of magnetic resistance, presumably to withstand today’s all-but-unavoidable onslaught of items with strong magnets.

    Brands typically make watches antimagnetic in two ways: using materials like silicon, which don’t conduct a magnetic charge, or enclosing the movement in a soft-metal case.

    Many brands have developed their own versions of antimagnetic materials — mostly silicon alloys, like, for example, Silinvar, created in collaboration by Rolex, Patek Philippe, the Swatch Group (which owns Omega) and the Swiss research group CSEM.

    A soft-metal case — like a Faraday cage, which conducts magnetism away from the movement — adds bulk to a timepiece so is more suitable for a chunky sports watch than a thinline style.

    “If you wanted a very small dress watch it’s harder, but for the sort of military-rooted watches we’re trying to make, it’s absolutely fine,” said Nick English, co-founder of the British watch brand Bremont. His brand’s Martin-Baker collection features movements that are suspended in rubber shells and surrounded by Faraday cages.

    Such watches have to have solid cases. “If you have a Faraday cage, you will have a back where you can’t show your movement,” said Raynald Aeschlimann, Omega’s president and chief executive. In 2013, the brand introduced an antimagnetic version of its Seamaster Aqua Terra, which did not cage its movement but still promised to resist magnetization up to 15,000 gauss. A few years earlier, when the company had begun developing the timepiece, it noticed that as much as 40 percent of all its service requests concerned magnetization.

    In 2015, the brand introduced an eight-step testing process for several functions, including resistance to magnetism. Many of its watches are subjected to that test, now accredited by the Federal Institute of Metrology in Switzerland, and are marketed as antimagnetic.

    In February, the International Organization for Standardization, an independent group based in Switzerland that issues guidelines on a broad range of products, published a report on watch magnetization, something it first examined in 1973. It did not call for a change in its original standard — watches can be described as antimagnetic if they resist 4,800 amperes per meter of direct contact, but it did add a new category of enhanced magnetic resistance at 16,000 amperes per meter.

    It’s just one more indication that the exposure of watches to magnetic fields looks likely to increase in our electronic-fueled environment.

    “It’s a phenomenon of our cosmos,” Mr. Koullapis said. “Don’t blame the watch.”
     
    Última modificación: 21/4/21
  7. Guancho

    Guancho Soloporschista veterano

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.152
    Me gusta recibidos:
    548
    Localización:
    Michigan
    A día de hoy con los escapes de silicio y otros materiales, el tema de la imantación va siendo cosa del pasado.
     
  8. xxavier

    xxavier Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    31/10/10
    Mensajes:
    1.663
    Me gusta recibidos:
    477
    Localización:
    Madrid
    Es muy interesante, y para mí algo sorprendente, lo que se dice en el artículo del NYT. Seguro que es todo cierto, porque es un periódico serio, aunque sea algo 'progre'...

    He hecho la prueba de mover un reloj de pulsera cerca de una brújula sensible, y sí que se produce una desviación de la aguja. Lo he probado con tres relojes mecánicos con caja de acero, y los tres han movido la aguja bastante... Luego he probado con dos con caja de oro, y también la han movido, pero menos. En todos los casos, con correa de cuero...

    Siempre en mi opinión, no es necesariamente porque 'estén magnetizados', sino porque el hierro de la caja y de la maquinaria perturba el campo magnético terrestre y la aguja lo detecta...

    Se entera uno de muchas cosas en este foro...
     
  9. cesarsim

    cesarsim Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    6/7/06
    Mensajes:
    3.362
    Me gusta recibidos:
    293
    Si acercas una metal a una brújula, que es un imán, la vas a mover. No tiene nada que ver con otra cosa ni con que tu reloj mágico, perturbe el campo magnético terrestre...
     
  10. xxavier

    xxavier Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    31/10/10
    Mensajes:
    1.663
    Me gusta recibidos:
    477
    Localización:
    Madrid
    Falso. No es lo mismo cualquier metal. Ha de ser un metal o aleación con propiedades magnéticas, en particular, ferromagnéticas. Si acercas un objeto de aluminio, plata o cobre a la aguja imantada, no se moverá, porque son metales que carecen de propiedades magnéticas.
     
  11. cesarsim

    cesarsim Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    6/7/06
    Mensajes:
    3.362
    Me gusta recibidos:
    293
    Hasta ahí, estamos de acuerdo. Pero en lo que tu decías, en absoluto. El acero, es de los ferromagnéticos. Yo tengo imanes en la nevera de inox: jaque mate.
     
  12. xxavier

    xxavier Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    31/10/10
    Mensajes:
    1.663
    Me gusta recibidos:
    477
    Localización:
    Madrid
    No. Lo que tú decías es que 'si acercas un metal a una brújula, la vas a mover. Y eso es falso, porque no sucede con cualquier metal. Ya sabes una cosa más.
     
  13. cesarsim

    cesarsim Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    6/7/06
    Mensajes:
    3.362
    Me gusta recibidos:
    293
    Eso lo sabe cualquiera. Lo que te digo es que los relojes que acercas, de acero, mueven la brújula por ser de acero. No porque estén magnetizados. Acerca un cuchillo inox, y vemos que pasa.
    Y no: un reloj de acero no modifica el campo magnético terrestre.
     
  14. xxavier

    xxavier Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    31/10/10
    Mensajes:
    1.663
    Me gusta recibidos:
    477
    Localización:
    Madrid

    Bueno, ya vas aprendiendo algo, pero te falta todavía progresar un poco más adecuadamente.

    Los materiales -elementos o aleaciones- con propiedades magnéticas modifican los campos magnéticos en que se hallen inmersos, y esta perturbación, especialmente intensa en los materiales ferromagnéticos, se puede detectar con un instrumento adecuado, que puede ser tan sencillo como una brújula en el caso de los materiales ferromagnéticos, que perturban el campo con más intensidad. Eso pasa con una masa de acero como la de la maquinaria de un reloj, construida casi totalmente de esa aleación.
    También puede aparecer un magnetismo remanente, que es precisamente lo que a veces causa problemas en relojes mecánicos, porque ciertos materiales ferromagnéticos, sometidos a un campo magnético, se convierten en imanes (como los de tu frigorífico) y la atracción consiguiente afecta a piezas que deben tener libertad de movimientos para que el reloj funcione bien.

    ¡Hala! Ya sabes algo más de física de la ESO...
     
  15. cesarsim

    cesarsim Soloporschista

    Se incorporó:
    6/7/06
    Mensajes:
    3.362
    Me gusta recibidos:
    293
    Vale, lo que tu digas. Sigue así.
     
  16. Guancho

    Guancho Soloporschista veterano

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.152
    Me gusta recibidos:
    548
    Localización:
    Michigan
    Me estoy perdiendo algo.
     
    A Porschistacanario le gusta esto.
  17. Guancho

    Guancho Soloporschista veterano

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.152
    Me gusta recibidos:
    548
    Localización:
    Michigan
    Insisto, a día de hoy, no es nada fácil imantar un reloj moderno de cierto posicionamiento. Aparte de que la mayor parte de los volantes son de bronce de berilio, Glucydur en relojes normales, cuando no de silicio, los demás componentes del escape (espiral, áncora y rueda de escape) también son ya casi todos amagnéticos en relojes de una calidad determinada. Como por ejemplo los componentes de níquel-fósforo que usa Rolex y la aleación de niobio y zirconio para el muelle espiral, o completamente de silicio en otras marcas. No hagáis caso de todo lo que leáis por ahí. El personal tiene que escribir para rellenar los formatos de las plataformas que les dan cobertura, para existir. Ocurre lo mismo en cualquier otra ámbito
     
    A Astra1980, Alfa156, Astur245 y 2 otros les gusta esto.
  18. Vollblut

    Vollblut Gran Experto Porschista

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.579
    Me gusta recibidos:
    512
    Localización:
    Barcelona
    P-Cars:
    944 S2 Cabriolet 1990, 944 Turbo Cabriolet 1991
    Puede que en los relojes actuales la imantación sea un problema menor, pero no así en los más antiguos, como mi Navitimer que el día 30 hará 27 años que lo llevo a diario.

    Estos relojes, como dice el artículo, son más susceptibles a este fenómeno cada vez más frecuente porque estamos rodeados de elementos magnéticos (móviles, portátiles, etc).
     
  19. Guancho

    Guancho Soloporschista veterano

    Se incorporó:
    29/6/06
    Mensajes:
    5.152
    Me gusta recibidos:
    548
    Localización:
    Michigan
    Estamos de acuerdo.